Finding Your Motivation for Binge Eating Disorder Recovery

Anorexia and bulimia have always been the two heavy hitters in the world of eating disorders.

In fact, Binge eating disorder (BED) was not officially recognized as a legitimate diagnosis until the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was published in 2013.

Prior to that time, BED was placed in the category of Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS).  This delayed recognition still proves stigmatizing and problematic for many of those we see in residential care.

Published on the Eating Disorder Hope blog on 11.1.17
Contributed to by: Lauren Klancic, MAT, Eating Disorder Specialist at Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center
Reviewed by: Jacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC

In a Deadly Obsession, Food Is the Enemy

This is a season of gustatory excess, when families gather at ample tables, offices hold lavish parties, and people eat and drink till they are beyond sated. Not everyone, though. There is a grimmer corner of America. It is populated by men and, more commonly, women who shun food not because they are too poor to afford it, but because they are too troubled to desire it.

The country’s obesity epidemic deservedly draws constant attention, but many have a diametrically opposite problem: They are obsessively, and perilously, thin. Some experts estimate that 30 million Americans are plagued at some point in their lives by disorders like anorexia nervosa, binge-eating and bulimia. About one-third of them are men, belying broadly held assumptions that this is almost exclusively a female concern. Many are blacks, Latinos and Asians, countering another routine belief that this is a whites-only issue.

Published on the New York Times website on 12.3.17
Written by: Clyde Haberman

Should People with Anorexia Be Force-Fed?

Last month, a New Jersey judge granted guardianship to the parents of a 20-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa, arguing that the woman is incapable of making her own medical decisions.This clears the way for the parents to take charge of treatment decisions for their daughter — known in court documents as S.A. — including the option of force-feeding.This follows on the heels of the death of a 30-year-old New Jersey woman known as Ashley G., who also had severe anorexia and restricted her food intake.

Superior Court Judge Paul Armstrong — the same judge as in S.A.’s case — honored Ashley’s wishes to stop artificial force-feeding.

The judge met with the woman and determined that she seemed to understand the consequences of refusing treatment.

These cases highlight the ethical fine line that doctors and judges must walk in deciding whether someone with anorexia should be treated against their wishes.

Published on the Healthline website on 11.27.17
Written by: Shawn Radcliffe

How to Beat the Holiday Blues

It may not seem like it, but the holiday season is just around the corner. And, while the holiday season is usually a time of joy and happiness, for some of us, the holidays can bring us holiday blues, not holiday cheer. According to healthline.com, holiday blues, or seasonal depression, is a condition that affects roughly 14% of Americans. There are several ways you can deal with the stress, anxiety, depression, and loneliness the holidays may bring.

Read the full newsletter including this article here.

Ties Between Immune Dysfunction, Eating Disorders ‘Increasingly Clear’

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A large Danish study of children and adolescents finds that autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders raise the risk for development of an eating disorder, and having an eating disorder raises the risk of subsequent autoimmune disease.

“Understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets,” write Dr. Cynthia Bulik from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues in a November 9 online article in Pediatrics.

Published on the Medscape website on 11.11.17
(Registration is required for full website access.)
Written by: Megan Brooks

What Coping Tools Work for My Eating Disorder and Anxiety?

Coping skills are helpful in the recovery process. When someone with anorexia nervosa has a comorbid diagnosis of anxiety, often the phrase ‘coping skills’ can seem unhelpful.

While working with your therapist, it is important to remember that how you cope with your symptoms can determine the rate of your progress while in treatment.

Coping can be defined as the “energy we use to manage, minimize, or tolerate both external and internal stressors, which can be real or perceived [1]’.

Individuals can either cope in positive and healthy ways or negative and unhealthy ways with stress.

Published on the Eating Disorder Hope blog on 11.8.17
Reviewed by: Jacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC

LA Clinician Uses Neurofeedback for Eating Disorders

The brain of someone with an eating disorder is fear-based, according to Los Altos clinician Theresa Chesnut.

It’s why sufferers starve themselves, binge and purge their food or compulsively exercise to lose an amount of weight that will never be satisfying.

But groundbreaking research in the area of neurofeedback is aiming to change that fear and turn it into self-healing.

Published on the Los Altos Town Crier website on 10.18.17
Written by: Grace Hase

Mobile Apps Show Promise for Treatment among Young Patients

Little evidence yet, but benefits stem from easier access to care.

It seems like a natural step—using mobile phone software applications (“apps”) designed for children and adolescents with mental health problems. Certainly, the technology is widely available, since in 2017 most children and teens have access to mobile phones. In one study, the authors reported that 72% of children aged 0 to 11, and 96% of those 12 to 17 years of age had their own cell phones (J Med Internet Res. 2013; 15: e: 120; doi:10.2196/jmir.2600).

When a team of researchers from the University of Bath and Oxford Health National Health Service Foundation Trust, Keynsham, UK, did an extensive literature review of mobile phone studies, only 24 publications qualified to be included in their final review (J Med Internet Res. 2017; 19:e176). The authors also found a nearly nonexistent evidence base for the use of such apps, especially among adolescents.

It seems like a natural step—using mobile phone software applications (“apps”) designed for children and adolescents with mental health problems. Certainly, the technology is widely available, since in 2017 most children and teens have access to mobile phones. In one study, the authors reported that 72% of children aged 0 to 11, and 96% of those 12 to 17 years of age had their own cell phones (J Med Internet Res. 2013; 15: e: 120; doi:10.2196/jmir.2600).

When a team of researchers from the University of Bath and Oxford Health National Health Service Foundation Trust, Keynsham, UK, did an extensive literature review of mobile phone studies, only 24 publications qualified to be included in their final review (J Med Internet Res. 2017; 19:e176). The authors also found a nearly nonexistent evidence base for the use of such apps, especially among adolescents.

Highlighting the Stress on Parents Caring for AN Patients

Needed changes in parenting style during FBT-based treatment can create marital stress.

In family-based treatment (FBT) for teens with anorexia nervosa (AN), parents are assigned the task of managing their son or daughter’s eating to help produce rapid weight restoration. In addition, parents are urged to work as a team united against the eating disorder.

Dr. Renee Rienecke, a psychologist at the University of South Carolina, Charleston, investigated the effects this intense treatment effort have upon marital satisfaction by evaluating parents of 53 adolescents with EDs enrolled in a partial hospitalization program (Eat Disord. 2017; doi.org/10.1080/10640266.2017.1330320). Dr. Rienecke reports that nearly half of the mothers and a third of the fathers indicated decreased satisfaction with their marriage over the course of their child’s treatment. Children whose parents reported a decrease in marital satisfaction then scored worse on measures of eating disorder psychopathology.